Makeup Design for Film + Television Curriculum

Term 1 Course Descriptions

Career Prep is subdivided into four parts (Term 1 and 6). This course gives historical and current context of the Make-up profession. It introduces students to the many different fields within makeup artistry, and also focuses on developing the research and practical skills that students must have in order to be a working makeup artist.

In term 1, the exploration of stage, film and television history, and the history of makeup art – mostly via lecture, visual imagery and film clips - will provide relevance and fluency to the language of the production environment the student is about to enter. Subjects covered include makeup usage in theatre, the development of and significance of cosmetics throughout history, and the evolution of makeup artistry within Hollywood. The effect of evolving film stocks, digital cameras and lighting is also studied through various film clips from the 20th Century.

This course introduces the student, by demonstration and practical application, to creating a specific character or communicating an idea through make-up. They learn common glamour techniques including false lash application and ‘smoky eye’ blending, as well as more advanced fashion based classes that allow them to creatively explore various forms of beauty. The course will consist mainly of live demonstrations and lectures followed by in-class practical exercises. Glamour & Fashion 02 introduces the students to the evolution of make-up styles throughout the 20th century, via demos and practical application. These classes further refine the students understanding of creating “period” character.
The developmental history of makeup styles and their influences are closely examined. It also has application to create character or communicate an idea in a way that meets the expectations of the fashion industry. Makeup for black and white photography, bridal makeup, and runway makeups are also explored. Written and visual reference materials reflecting current industry practices are also supplied to students as they are immediately relevant to class activities. Additionally, students’ retention and knowledge will be measured and reinforced by a practical application assignment at the end of 01 and 02.

In its most basic sense, Visual Art exposes students to art theory and technique in mediums outside of makeup application so that their understanding of makeup can be supported by this wider scope. Instructors cover subjects, such as colour theory, life drawing, photography, chart design, oil painting, and airbrush technique. This course extends through Term 2.

Here we introduce the students to the ‘language’ of the film set and gives broaderscope of the makeup artist’s duties, and introduce them to the concept and importance of continuity. This course also serves to integrate the students with people from other departments (FILM, ACTING). Field trips to industry suppliers also serve to de-mystify the materials procurement process. This course also expands the students product knowledge, and to educate them in how to shop wisely and avoid the pitfalls of advertising. They are also exposed to film and television set etiquette and mechanics, and introduced to the basic workings of a film set, by preparing to participate in film shoots. It also focuses on developing their time management skills. The students will then participate in actual film shoots and production meetings (Terms 3 and 4) as well as a fashion photo shoot (Term 3). Outside of the classroom hours, Instructor supervision is occasional during the film shoots to check in and deal with any practical issues. There is also an historical research assignment of 20th Century Make-up Artists and their achievements. This course is in terms 1, 3 and 4.

This course lays the groundwork for all future Corrective, Beauty and Glamour makeups.It introduces the students to the fundamentals of corrective application, product and equipment choices and then develops their “eye”, or ability to discern the needs of each particular performer and bring shape and form into aesthetic balance. The course will consist mainly of live demonstrations and lectures followed by in-class practical exercises. Extensive written and visual reference materials reflecting current industry practices are also supplied to students as they are immediately relevant to class activities. This course also familiarizes the students with the basics of facial anatomy in terms of bones and muscles specifically, so that they have a better understanding of the system that supports the canvas (the skin) on which they must work. Students develop an understanding of the responsibility of the Makeup Artist (to the actor, the production, and themselves) to safeguard the performers skin. Additionally, students’ retention and knowledge will be measured and reinforced by a practical application lab and a practical application assignment.

This course introduces students to Adobe Photoshop – the world’s most powerful image editing software. For design use, the industry expectation has increased for every department to use it. For Make-up Artists, knowledge with this software can be invaluable as it streamlines the design and approval process. Whether one is creating a design for a monster or a new fashion look, a photo-realistic rendering can be generated and easily altered into many versions, negating the need for costly and time consuming tests. Students will learn the basics of the interface and solid skills like painting on layers, creating selections as well as basic color adjustment culminating in a design assignment that features character work. Featuring a Photoshop design in their portfolio becomes a useful item to showcase as part of their skill set. In later terms students are encouraged to do their design charts on computer and will continue to re-visit Photoshop regularly in every term to build their photographic portfolios. Students will see many samples of actual working portfolios as they are guided into assembling their own polished, professional caliber book. This course culminates in a review panel of industry professionals who critique the students’ books before they go to print so vital final changes can be made. This course extends spans all Terms; 1 2,3,4,5 and 6 (listed as 01, 02 and 03).

Term 2 Course Descriptions

This course encompasses the wide range of ‘out of kit” effects (makeup effects created from scratch on set, as opposed to prosthetics pieces that are pre made in a shop). This includes: blood products and their many uses, bruising techniques, scrapes, cuts, scars, three dimensional effects such as burns or broken noses created with wax sculpture or by application of gelatin. The students are also introduced to proven theory and techniques relating to the realistic re-creation of bullet wounds, their effects and both two-dimensional and three-dimensional application to the performer. This expansive and detailed course further develops the students understanding of make-up creating character, and how products can be manipulated to achieve specific effects. It also gives them a practical understanding of continuity and the necessity of script breakdowns. Students are exposed to the various materials and challenges presented when creating character teeth effects and are also familiarized with what materials to use when replicating tears for a ‘crying’ scene, as well as theory and technique regarding artificial snow and ice effects. Written and visual reference materials reflecting current industry practices are also supplied to students as they are immediately relevant to class activities. Additionally, students’ retention and knowledge will be measured and reinforced by a practical application assignment.

This course introduces the student, by demonstration and practical application, to creating a specific character or communicating an idea through make-up. They learn common glamour techniques including false lash application and ‘smoky eye’ blending, as well as more advanced fashion based classes that allow them to creatively explore various forms of beauty. The course will consist mainly of live demonstrations and lectures followed by in-class practical exercises. Glamour & Fashion 02 introduces the students to the evolution of make-up styles throughout the 20th century, via demos and practical application. These classes further refine the students understanding of creating “period” character.

The developmental history of makeup styles and their influences are closely examined. It also has application to create character or communicate an idea in a way that meets the expectations of the fashion industry. Makeup for black and white photography, bridal makeup, and runway makeups are also explored. Written and visual reference materials reflecting current industry practices are also supplied to students as they are immediately relevant to class activities. Additionally, students’ retention and knowledge will be measured and reinforced by a practical application assignment at the end of 01 and 02.

In its most basic sense, Visual Art exposes the students to color theory and technique in mediums outside of makeup application, so that their understanding of makeup can be supported by this wider scope, and thus refined. This course encompasses the following subjects: color theory, oil painting, design charts and airbrush technique.

This course introduces the students to the very basic concepts of hairstyling, and gives them their first opportunity to be ‘hands on’ with hair. This class introduces the students to the theories and techniques behind hair styling and wig application, including hair prep and cleaning. Term 3 classes include how to prep hair for a wig application as well as styling synthetic hair wigs. Preparing long and short hair for bald cap applications is also demonstrated and practiced. Hairstyling is an auxiliary skill often essential in the environment of independent and low-budget film projects, is typically related to a student’s earliest employment opportunity. This course extends into Term 3.

This course builds on the knowledge developed in Digital Media & Design 1, further finessing students' skills and supporting the digital makeup design work that they must do later in the program, including creating pages for their portfolio.

Term 3 Course Descriptions

This course educates the student, mostly through practical application, in basic to advanced techniques for preparing and hand laying facial hair, constructing, applying and painting wax facial features, as well as introducing products and techniques used for body make-ups and body paints (and discerning the difference in the two genres.). Students also refine their painting and design skills through a series of makeup exercises, including airbrushing, that put their research abilities to the test while allowing them some creative exploration. Non-prosthetic age techniques are fully explored and practised. They also introduced to proven theory and techniques relating to the adhering, painting and removal of gelatin prosthetic appliances. Written and visual reference materials reflecting current industry practices are also supplied to students as they are immediately relevant to class activities. Additionally, students’ retention and knowledge will be measured and reinforced by several practical application assignment. This course carries over two terms as Character Technique 01 and 02.

This course educates the student, mostly through practical application, in the proper techniques for both fabricating and applying successful bald caps. Students also refine their painting skills (including airbrushing) through a series of practical applications. Written and visual reference materials reflecting current industry practices are also supplied to students as they are immediately relevant to class activities. Additionally, students’ retention and knowledge will be measured and reinforced by several other practical application assignments.

Here we introduce the students to the ‘language’ of the film set and gives broader scope of the makeup artist’s duties, and introduce them to the concept and importance of continuity. This course also serves to integrate the students with people from other departments (FILM, ACTING). Field trips to industry suppliers also serve to de-mystify the materials procurement process. This course also expands the students product knowledge, and to educate them in how to shop wisely and avoid the pitfalls of advertising. They are also exposed to film and television set etiquette and mechanics, and introduced to the basic workings of a film set, by preparing to participate in film shoots. It also focuses on developing their time management skills. The students will then participate in actual film shoots and production meetings (Terms 3 and 4) as well as a fashion photo shoot (Term 3). Outside of the classroom hours, Instructor supervision is occasional during the film shoots to check in and deal with any practical issues. There is also an historical research assignment of 20th Century Make-up Artists and their achievements. This course is in terms 1, 3 and 4.

This course introduces students to Adobe Photoshop – the world’s most powerful image editing software. For design use, the industry expectation has increased for every department to use it. For Make-up Artists, knowledge with this software can be invaluable as it streamlines the design and approval process. Whether one is creating a design for a monster or a new fashion look, a photo-realistic rendering can be generated and easily altered into many versions, negating the need for costly and time consuming tests. Students will learn the basics of the interface and solid skills like painting on layers, creating selections as well as basic color adjustment culminating in a design assignment that features character work. Featuring a Photoshop design in their portfolio becomes a useful item to showcase as part of their skill set. In later terms students are encouraged to do their design charts on computer and will continue to re-visit Photoshop regularly in every term to build their photographic portfolios. Students will see many samples of actual working portfolios as they are guided into assembling their own polished, professional caliber book. This course culminates in a review panel of industry professionals who critique the students’ books before they go to print so vital final changes can be made. This course extends spans all Terms; 1 2,3,4,5 and 6 (listed as 01, 02 and 03).

This course is introduced in term three and most of it is rolled out in term four. It consists of mostly practical application classes, supplemented by lectures. In it, students learn how to do life casting (making an impression of a living being using alginate and plaster) both through both lecture and practical application. They then move on to sculpting features on the life-casts in order to create something that a mold can be made of. Sculpts range from human ears and noses to large full-face character creations. Following this, students mold their sculpts, in order to create a negative mold. Molds can then be filled with liquid latex or gelatin in order to make realistic, three dimensional prosthetics appliances. This course also examines other aspects of prosthetics; the casting and creation of dental veneers, prosthetic transfers. Written and visual reference materials reflecting current industry practices are also supplied to students as they are immediately relevant to class activities. Additionally, students’ retention and knowledge will be measured and reinforced by a practical application assignment and exam, carried out at the end of term four.

Term 4 Course Descriptions

This course educates the student, mostly through practical application, in basic to advanced techniques for preparing and hand laying facial hair, constructing, applying and painting wax facial features, as well as introducing products and techniques used for body make-ups and body paints (and discerning the difference in the two genres.). Students also refine their painting and design skills through a series of makeup exercises, including airbrushing, that put their research abilities to the test while allowing them some creative exploration. Non-prosthetic age techniques are fully explored and practised. They also introduced to proven theory and techniques relating to the adhering, painting and removal of gelatin prosthetic appliances. Written and visual reference materials reflecting current industry practices are also supplied to students as they are immediately relevant to class activities. Additionally, students’ retention and knowledge will be measured and reinforced by several practical application assignment. This course carries over two terms as Character Technique 01 and 02.

Here we introduce the students to the ‘language’ of the film set and gives broader scope of the makeup artist’s duties, and introduce them to the concept and importance of continuity. This course also serves to integrate the students with people from other departments (FILM, ACTING). Field trips to industry suppliers also serve to de-mystify the materials procurement process. This course also expands the students product knowledge, and to educate them in how to shop wisely and avoid the pitfalls of advertising. They are also exposed to film and television set etiquette and mechanics, and introduced to the basic workings of a film set, by preparing to participate in film shoots. It also focuses on developing their time management skills. The students will then participate in actual film shoots and production meetings (Terms 3 and 4) as well as a fashion photo shoot (Term 3). Outside of the classroom hours, Instructor supervision is occasional during the film shoots to check in and deal with any practical issues. There is also an historical research assignment of 20th Century Make-up Artists and their achievements. This course is in terms 1, 3 and 4.

This course introduces students to Adobe Photoshop – the world’s most powerful image editing software. For design use, the industry expectation has increased for every department to use it. For Make-up Artists, knowledge with this software can be invaluable as it streamlines the design and approval process. Whether one is creating a design for a monster or a new fashion look, a photo-realistic rendering can be generated and easily altered into many versions, negating the need for costly and time consuming tests. Students will learn the basics of the interface and solid skills like painting on layers, creating selections as well as basic color adjustment culminating in a design assignment that features character work. Featuring a Photoshop design in their portfolio becomes a useful item to showcase as part of their skill set. In later terms students are encouraged to do their design charts on computer and will continue to re-visit Photoshop regularly in every term to build their photographic portfolios. Students will see many samples of actual working portfolios as they are guided into assembling their own polished, professional caliber book. This course culminates in a review panel of industry professionals who critique the students’ books before they go to print so vital final changes can be made. This course extends spans all Terms; 1 2,3,4,5 and 6 (listed as 01, 02 and 03).

This course is introduced in term three and most of it is rolled out in term four. It consists of mostly practical application classes, supplemented by lectures. In it, students learn how to do life casting (making an impression of a living being using alginate and plaster) both through both lecture and practical application. They then move on to sculpting features on the life-casts in order to create something that a mold can be made of. Sculpts range from human ears and noses to large full-face character creations. Following this, students mold their sculpts, in order to create a negative mold. Molds can then be filled with liquid latex or gelatin in order to make realistic, three dimensional prosthetics appliances. This course also examines other aspects of prosthetics; the casting and creation of dental veneers, prosthetic transfers. Written and visual reference materials reflecting current industry practices are also supplied to students as they are immediately relevant to class activities. Additionally, students’ retention and knowledge will be measured and reinforced by a practical application assignment and exam, carried out at the end of term four.

Term 5 Course Descriptions

Many artists use “slip” or dwell-molded latex masks to create detailed, inexpensive versions of animatronics masks or foam latex appliance makeups. Through lectures and practical applications, this course teaches students all the steps necessary to create a full-head latex mask. Students then develop their sculpting, mould-making, painting skills, and other techniques, such as hair punching.

This course builds on the students Term Four knowledge of design, sculpting, molding, painting materials and techniques. Traditionally, in the realm of modern prosthetic make-ups, foam latex has been the most common go to material, an industry standard since the 1930’s. Students are introduced to the chemical components and mixing procedures as well as how to bake (cure) foam latex in a special oven. On the application side, we learn how to make acrylic adhesive paint mixtures, how they are applied and removed. By handling samples, seeing demo applications and, finally, doing practical application, students become adept at the many techniques for best applying and painting foam latex. Building towards their Term Five practical exam, students will design, sculpt, mold and then run those molds with foam latex in order to make prosthetics appliances resulting in a fantastical character.

This course is specifically intended to further develop the students’ abilities to prep, apply and style wigs. Students are become familiar with the special needs (in terms of care and application) of film quality human hair hand-tied wigs with lace fronts. Students will learn to measure a head for a custom fit wig (ordered from a wigmaker) as well as how to apply, style, remove, clean, block and prep lace front wigs. Hairstyling is an auxiliary skill often essential in the environment of independent and low-budget film projects, is typically related to a student’s earliest employment opportunities.
Lace front wigs, pre-made false moustaches, beards and other hair pieces are hand tied to film grade lace. Students will learn the proper technique for measuring the face (in order to ensure a custom fit), knotting the hair onto the lace (called ventilating), and blocking, trimming, perming, dressing, applying and removing the pieces that they make.

Silicone introduces the student to this versatile material that can be used in various forms for casting, molding and fabricated prosthetics. Partial face casts using silicone will be done so students can create a nose cast on which they sculpt a different character nose. They will also use silicone to create negative molds for the bondo prosthetics they sculpt. Eventually, students will learn the formulas and how to run silicone to produce an encapsulated, gel filled prosthetic nose that they will apply. The students will further hone and refine their sculpting, painting and application skills.

This course introduces students to Adobe Photoshop – the world’s most powerful image editing software. For design use, the industry expectation has increased for every department to use it. For Make-up Artists, knowledge with this software can be invaluable as it streamlines the design and approval process. Whether one is creating a design for a monster or a new fashion look, a photo-realistic rendering can be generated and easily altered into many versions, negating the need for costly and time consuming tests. Students will learn the basics of the interface and solid skills like painting on layers, creating selections as well as basic color adjustment culminating in a design assignment that features character work. Featuring a Photoshop design in their portfolio becomes a useful item to showcase as part of their skill set. In later terms students are encouraged to do their design charts on computer and will continue to re-visit Photoshop regularly in every term to build their photographic portfolios. Students will see many samples of actual working portfolios as they are guided into assembling their own polished, professional caliber book. This course culminates in a review panel of industry professionals who critique the students’ books before they go to print so vital final changes can be made. This course extends spans all Terms; 1 2,3,4,5 and 6 (listed as 01, 02 and 03).

Term 6 Course Descriptions

In Term 6, the majority of the focus is on Career Prep, broken down into three sections by content; 02, 03 & 04. Career Prep 02 is Portfolio Labs where students are editing and assembling the photographs of their best work. This leads to the grading and printing of their final portfolios. Career Prep 03 is focused on the practical creation of a final project for their portfolios; another prosthetic make-up, mask or display bust of their own creation. Career Prep 04 is the final lectures that provide students with the critical information as to how they should approach the industry; resume’s, interviews, union entrance, budgets, negotiating contracts, etc. There is also special classes where a working alumni addresses the class as to their recent experience within industry.

This course is introduced in term three and most of it is rolled out in term four. It consists of mostly practical application classes, supplemented by lectures. In it, students learn how to do life casting (making an impression of a living being using alginate and plaster) both through both lecture and practical application. They then move on to sculpting features on the life-casts in order to create something that a mold can be made of. Sculpts range from human ears and noses to large full-face character creations. Following this, students mold their sculpts, in order to create a negative mold. Molds can then be filled with liquid latex or gelatin in order to make realistic, three dimensional prosthetics appliances. This course also examines other aspects of prosthetics; the casting and creation of dental veneers, prosthetic transfers. Written and visual reference materials reflecting current industry practices are also supplied to students as they are immediately relevant to class activities. Additionally, students’ retention and knowledge will be measured and reinforced by a practical application assignment and exam, carried out at the end of term four.

Silicone introduces the student to this versatile material that can be used in various forms for casting, molding and fabricated prosthetics. Partial face casts using silicone will be done so students can create a nose cast on which they sculpt a different character nose. They will also use silicone to create negative molds for the bondo prosthetics they sculpt. Eventually, students will learn the formulas and how to run silicone to produce an encapsulated, gel filled prosthetic nose that they will apply. The students will further hone and refine their sculpting, painting and application skills.

This course introduces students to Adobe Photoshop – the world’s most powerful image editing software. For design use, the industry expectation has increased for every department to use it. For Make-up Artists, knowledge with this software can be invaluable as it streamlines the design and approval process. Whether one is creating a design for a monster or a new fashion look, a photo-realistic rendering can be generated and easily altered into many versions, negating the need for costly and time consuming tests. Students will learn the basics of the interface and solid skills like painting on layers, creating selections as well as basic color adjustment culminating in a design assignment that features character work. Featuring a Photoshop design in their portfolio becomes a useful item to showcase as part of their skill set. In later terms students are encouraged to do their design charts on computer and will continue to re-visit Photoshop regularly in every term to build their photographic portfolios. Students will see many samples of actual working portfolios as they are guided into assembling their own polished, professional caliber book. This course culminates in a review panel of industry professionals who critique the students’ books before they go to print so vital final changes can be made. This course extends spans all Terms; 1 2,3,4,5 and 6 (listed as 01, 02 and 03).